John Mopel Napais

About Zidisha Profiles Zidisha entrepreneurs write their own loan profiles and provide their own photos. English is not usually their first language, and many had to overcome great obstacles to obtain an education. Additionally, many do not have cameras and own only a small number of personal photos. As a result, the profiles are not always as polished as on other websites. To keep profiles genuine, Zidisha staff do not make any edits, with the exception of titles for clarity and English translations.

My Story

He is married with one wife and five children, of whom four are in school, i.e. 3 in primary school, one is in the top class, the other still young. Business profits are used to increase stock, pay school fees, buy clothing and household expenses.

About My Business

Businessman at Oloolaimutia Centre running a poshomill (corn milling service) at the small centre. He also started business in the year 2000 .i.e. buying and selling cattle. He had only Ksh.10,000 (US $128) capital. He improved gradually and later diverted to open up a poshomill in 2004 which he saw it was a good business. Before he had 18 cows and has now 50. He joined Kenya Women Federation Trust (KWFT, a local microfinance institution) in 2007 where he was financed and increased his business.

My Loan Proposal

Since the assistance from the previous lenders i would like to sincerely appreciate for the full support. I would like to expand more bags of maize and restock a small tea room at Oloolaimutia Trading center.Each bag of maize would cost Ksh 1,500 per bag and would purchase 30 number of bags. The total amount is Ksh 45,000,then transporting cost will be ksh 2,000 then the total amount for my small posho mill will consume ksh 47,000.The income will be generated weekly. I approxmite that it will generate Ksh 3000 per week. The tea room would need to be re-stock for buying 50 kilograms of sugar,one sachet of tea leaves and one bundle of wheat flour for making African chapati and mandazi which are very sweat and delicious.I would make a profit of Ksh 2000 per week on the Tea room side.This will enable with the income from posho mill. This income will be ksh (3000 *4) + (2000 * 4)=ksh 12,000 per month. This will help me to pay Zidisha loan and also keep the faith of my family.Seeing forward for you are generous support.



Comments

 

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  Apr 04, 2014

Test.

Hello Lenders,

I recently talked to Mr. Napais on phone and here's what he told me-
His sisted was hospitalized and he had to pay for her treatment. He still owes the hospital 60,000 shillings so he had to give them the title deed of his shamba (farm).
He also had to pay the school/exam fees for one of his children.
He requested for more time before beginning his payment. He assured me he would be able to start making small payments from May 2012

Achintya
Kenya

Dear lenders,

We received this message today from Mr Napais:

This is john jambo we are fine i could make to pay my loan the date i promise my sister got road axdance he is at tenwek hospital his leg is cutting off i need prayer and forgives for more dealy to pay the loan pass this for zidisha members thanks@

Dear lenders,

I spoke with Mr Napais today. His brother's wife had been in the hospital due to birthing difficulties, which ended in surgery. Mr Napais' sister-in-law is recovering well, but I am sorry to say that she lost the baby.

Mr Napais reports that his business activities have come to a standstill, following the loss of most of his working capital to a fraudulent supplier and to family medical bills. He attempted to sell a cow last week in order to repay his Zidisha loan, but reports that the market was not good, and he will try again next week.

Best,

Julia Kurnia, Director

Dear lenders,

I spoke today with Mr Napais. He is in the hospital at the moment, attending to his brother's wife who is seriously ill and needs surgery. Mr Napais tells me that he has not yet been able to raise the funds needed to catch up on his loan repayments, and that he is working with his neighbors to schedule a fundraising event next month. If successful, he will use the funds to catch up on his loan repayments.

In the meantime, Mr Napais is facing pressing financial needs in his own family, due to his sister-in-law's hospital bills and his house rental payment which comes due shortly.

Best regards,

Julia Kurnia, Director

Dear lenders,

I spoke today with Mr Napais regarding his loan. This is his second Zidisha loan, which he received after fully repaying his first loan in November last year. He used the loan to purchase a large stock of maize for his mill from a trader in Tanzania. Unfortunately, the trader did not deliver the maize and absconded with Mr Napais' payment. Since then, Mr Napais has been working to build up his earnings in the face of the severe drought which has impacted the entire region of Somalia and Kenya this year. Yesterday for the first time it rained in Mr Napais' area of the Masai Mara. He is optimistic that he will be in a position to begin making repayments again by the end of the month.

Please do not hesitate to contact me with any questions or comments.

Best,

Julia Kurnia, Director

julia@zidisha.org

John Mopel Napais   Mar 23, 2011

Hallo Leaders !
This is John i apologize for not posting any comments, i have passed difficult time this round .
I bought maize from Tanzania they corned me money but i didn't get maize.
I didn't buy anything because i didn't get any maize this round. This round the money i got didn't help my business but the rest of money about twenty thousand i paid for my child school fees. But after experiencing that problem i sold one of cow my cow at ksh 20,000 /= and i started a new business.
The amount of money you gave unto me assisted me a lot because i build a house of four big rooms.
Here in Kenya will are fine doing well. Write now we are enjoying rain in Kenya . Here in Maasai Mara cows are okey .

Thank you.

Regards.

John

Tuesday is market day in Oloolamitia, Masai Mara. Because market day draws people from neighboring areas, Mr. Napais' businesses are busiest and generate the most profit on market day. Individuals doing business in the livestock "soko" (market) or clothing/foodstuff soko stop by his shop for some maize meal to satisfy their weekly needs or recharge in his tearoom with some "chai" (Kenyan tea with milk and sugar) and "mandazi" (fried dough).

(foodstuff soko, morning-before the craziness starts)
http://www.overstream.net/view.php?oid=ailfnwskrtng

(foodstuff soko, afternoon-very busy!)
http://www.overstream.net/view.php?oid=arrqe3uym6l9

(livestock soko, also morning)
http://www.overstream.net/view.php?oid=ablutwuelqea

John Mopel Napais   Dec 13, 2010

Lots of greetings to all my lenders and the entire Zidisha family. Am doing well & my business is good. Now i have plenty of stock that meets my customers demand this was not possible without your help. I welcome you all to the Mara Mbuzi italala. from the profit generated in the last one month I'm ploughing three acre of maize to feed my poshomill. My family enjoy my festive season because i have something to cater for what they may require. Enjoy your christmas

John Mopel Napais   Sep 17, 2010

I was just recently from Trans-Mara buying maize.This is the place where farming is done in large cultivating. I have bought ten sucks of maize sack was bought at Ksh 3000 that cost up to 30,000 ksh and i have also sold my bulls up to Ksh 60,000.I have divided to four portion i have expanded my business and paid my school fees and also paid the loan from zidisha.I hope to make the last installment coming the end of this month after making profit and loss accounts.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=T6g_T0eEhnk
Mr. Napais' mill (warning: this video is LOUD)

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=cXYfRI-5WNY
Mr. Napais talks about his business

John Mopel Napais   Jul 11, 2010

i delay for the paiyment of last month because i was sick with malaria and the money i have i use to go to hospital. Ad try to sale acow at our market and the price is not good and i cent to the big mayket and so i able to paid. Thank you

On Tuesday I visited Mr. Napais and he showed me his business. He is an extremely friendly and enthusiastic man (a common trait among people here). He is also articulate and speaks English quite well. His milling equipment was quite impressive. From my experience working with Kenyan entrepreneurs involved in small-scale value addition with groundnuts (peanuts), I understand the large investment that such an apparatus involves, especially in a remote village like Oloolamutia where all power comes from generators, which require fuel to operate. Nevertheless, it is much more profitable to mill maize for sale than to simply buy and sell it, as milling adds value to the product. This should allow Mr. Napais’ business to earn him a good profit in the long run.
Mr. Napais’ business was deeply affected by the drought that swept Kenya from October to January this year, shortly after he received his loan from Zidisha. Many of his customers did not have money to pay him for maize during this time, yet Mr. Napais was too kind-hearted to refuse them and gave them maize anyway. Now that the drought has passed, people are paying Mr. Napais the money they owed him months ago and can afford to buy more maize and maize flour. Tuesday is the market day in Oloolamutia, when people come from surrounding villages to buy and sell livestock and many other goods. This is the busiest day for business owners in the town, and Mr. Napais was constantly moving to make sure that his shop was running smoothly.
As is common in Kenya, Mr. Napais supports not only his wife and five children with his income, but also members of his extended family who have fallen upon difficult times. His sister’s husband passed away and now he pays for the school fees of her two daughters. He has also supports his mother since his own father passed away.
Now that his maize business is once again earning profits, Mr. Napais’ dream is to expand to open a convenience store, as well. He would sell a variety of goods such as sugar, salt, soda, cooking oil, laundry detergent, and Masai blankets.

Hello, lenders.

My name is Lauren Rosenbaum and I will be Zidisha’s Client Relations Manager for Kenya over the next two months. I am currently stationed in Oloolamutia, a small town near the Masai Mara game reserve. Zisisha currently has four borrowers in Oloolamutia and surrounding villages and hopes to expand loans to more qualified applicants. Because this is a remote region, opportunities for microcredit are scarce and many people are excited that Zidisha offers a new credit option.

I have worked in Kenya once before, as a communications intern for the International Crops Research Institute for the Semi-Arid Tropics in Nairobi. Through this work I met food processors and grain traders in the city as well as farmers, grain traders, and small-scale entrepreneurs in the rural areas of Western Kenya. What has always struck me about this country is the keen instinct for business that exists among residents of both rural and urban areas. Kenyans are very good at identifying demands for certain products and services within their communities. In Oloolamutia, the local economy once depended mostly on money generated from tourists through the sale of locally made crafts in maniatas (Masai cultural villages). While the Masai continue to sell their goods to tourists, most of their income is now made through the sale of goods and services to other residents of the region. Entrepreneurs engage in a wide variety of activities, from shuttling residents to different areas or the region to selling livestock drugs to pastoral Masai, for whom the care of cows, goats, and other animals is their main livelihood.

The Masai in this region seem quite open to business opportunities such as Zidisha that rely on technology. There are three pubs in town that have satellite dishes for televisions, and the owners of these pubs charge visitors to watch football games. As in many other parts of the country, most people own cell phones. M-pesa mobile money is also a very important part of people’s lives here, as it allows individuals to deposit and withdraw money through their phones rather than traveling long distances to reach a bank.

Business relationships in Oloolamutia and other places in the country are built on mutual respect and friendship and depend just as much on this dynamic as they do on price. It is for this reason that I believe Zidisha to be a good model for the area. Zidisha allows borrowers to have one-on-one interactions with lenders, without relying on intermediaries. I encourage lenders to take advantage of this unique system and comment on your borrowers’ profiles regularly.

John Mopel Napais   Jun 22, 2010

Hi Lenders,My business is running smoothly after serious drought that really swept all the stock[Cattle].My shop is know back,i am planning to equip more on Maize,50 number of bags.The price per bag is Ksh 1500.The selling price per bag is Ksh 1800.Making a profit of Ksh 15,000.I will pay the loan and would want to expand my business have a shop for food staffs at Meguarre center.I promise to be update in re-payment.I apologies for late re-payment.The loan assisted me to pay two of my kids and two of my sister who attend Siana boarding school.My two are attending Mara Shinners Academy.After having my small shop near home it will enable me to carter for my kids and my family at large.

John Mopel Napais   May 19, 2010

Hi my dear suporters i am doing good in my business but i have delayed my re-payment due to much harvest of my trading products.Which lowered the prices of this products{Maize}Most of some community around maasai mara are doing some agriculture of cultivating.I am applogiesing for this month delay.The re-payment i will make since the money that i do have are less than the required amount.Also we do have a problem of browesing equipment and a camera.An other problem that we have is sending money through M-PESA system. By this i mean the only possible M-PESA that we do have in our regieon have little amoumt of units.Otherwise we will try our level to make.

Dear lenders, I'd just like to add some further explanation to Mr Napais' posting based on my experience in Kenya. He mentions difficulty in accessing a computer (browsing equipment) and digital camera. When I visited his settlement last year, there was only one laptop computer that was turned on occasionally and used to access the internet with the help of a small generator and mobile modem.

M-PESA is a money transfer service which Zidisha uses to disburse loans and accept repayments in Kenya. It allows Kenyan residents to transfer money with their cell phones via secure SMS message, which can then be exchanged for cash at mobile phone card retail shops. The difficulty Mr Napais cites here is that the M-PESA agents in his area are short of working cash, which results in delays in their ability to send repayment installments for Zidisha borrowers. I am told that the cash shortage at the local M-PESA outlet has become more acute in recent months, so that Zidisha borrowers must often go to a nearby town about a day's journey from their settlement in order to send their repayments.

Best,

Julia

Hi, thanks for the update. What do kids there learn in school? How do they spend their free time?
Best,
Julia

John Mopel Napais   Jan 19, 2010

They learn how to write & read in Kiswahili and English. Kenya primary education syllabus cover other subjects science, mathematics, geograph, history, agriculture, home/science, business education etc. After school and on weekends boys go and herd calves, sheep & cattle. Girls help their mothers in general house cleannes, taking care of the young kids fetching water & firewood. At the age of 18 and above boys start helping their fathers in fencing bomas, cattle brading & ear notching while girls engage in house construction and beadwork.


When the kids finish school, they are expected to live a different life of living in modern homes, they have acquired skills for earning a living other than depending entirely on cattle and will be able to plan & manage what they do in a more professional way. (response provided by Johnson Kuyioni on Mr Napais\' behalf)

John Mopel Napais   Jan 14, 2010

Mr Napais operates a business of posh mill (maize milling service) at oloolaimutia tranding center.He buys 20 sacks of maize at ksh2500 (US$35) per sack of maize.Re-sell one sack of maize at ksh3000 (US $42).He also mills and sell as ready mill which farry in price that is one sack is ksh3450 (US $48).Mr Napais business is working well having no any hinder.He uses profit gained to pay two employees which earns ksh3000 (US $42) per month per person.He pays school for three kids. (Update provided by Mr Johnson Kuyioni on Mr Napais\' behalf)

Note from Julia Kurnia: I visited this applicant's settlement of Olooloimuitia in the Maasai Mara, a vast gorgeous nature reserve in Southern Kenya, with amazing landscapes and so many wild animals that people protect their villages with thorn bushes and don't leave the barricaded areas without a long spear and club. Olooloimuitia has no electricity, roads and no banks for over a day's journey in all directions. The only Internet access is via a mobile modem on the laptop of the resident Ebony Microfinance Institution loan officer, which he powers up as necessary by paying a few dollars to use the settlement's small power generator. The Maasai people are famous for their traditional warrior lifestyle, diet of meat, milk and cow's blood, and dramatic beaded jewelry, but they are also one of the most impoverished groups in Africa and subject to frequent food shortage due to climate change in recent years. Access to loans allows entrepreneurs like this applicant to grow businesses which provide some savings for lean periods, and school fees for children.

Until recently microfinance wasn't viable in the Olooloimuitia area, because banks that were needed to cash checks and make repayment deposits were too far away. Then M-PESA, a unique money transfer system that allows users to send cash payments electronically via mobile phone SMS codes, was introduced in Kenya. A couple years ago an enterprising Maasai, Titanet Ole Njapit, opened the first M-PESA mobile phone payments outlet in the Maasai Mara using a loan from Ebony, Zidisha's local borrower due diligence partner. Mr. Njapit's M-PESA service brought microfinance to Oloolaimuitia for the first time, as borrowers could use their cell phones to make payment transactions without needing to travel to banks. This led to a small revolution as low-income herders began using loans to break into the cattle and grain trading networks that had previously been dominated by a few wealthy businessmen.

The applicant featured here used two microfinance loans to start up a corn mill, a valuable service in an area where flour often has to be ground by hand. The loan requested here will allow him to diversify into maize storage and resale, a simple business that will improve local food security by smoothing price fluctuations, while creating an additional stream of cash to be used for household expenses, reinvestment in the business and children's school fees. The applications from Oloolaimuitia build on the successful experience of Mr. Njapit, who borrowed $650 from Zidisha in April 2009 to buy a stock of inexpensive mobile phone handsets for retail sale at his M-PESA outlet. To date he has made five monthly repayment installments on time and in full, using M-PESA for all transactions. Please post any questions or comments here, or email me at julia@zidisha.org for a direct response. Thanks!

Test.

Repayment Schedule Changes

John Mopel Napais   Jan 05, 2012

Jambo all zidisha members iapologie for much delay for the paiment the reason is i face more trable this season i look forward to pay end of january now i tray to pay school fees for 3children i request to pay 2000 a month i bague for givens thanks
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John Mopel Napais   Sep 27, 2011

Hallo.zidisha.members.this.is.john.i.apolgy.for.the.dealy.of.the.payment.the.reason.is.iface.more.problems.1.ibuy.maize.at.t.z.and.peole.coning.me.50.000ksh.2.i.got.injering.my.hand.and.i.use.aloat.of.money.3.on.july i sale 1 cow of 20.000ksh.last week wen iprepare to pay my younger brother become sick and my brother dont have anything to pay the hospital bill for the oparashion which cos 35.000ksh my prayer is my the lord door for to pay loan my plan now is to sale 1cow to get capital to start new bisners iapolog forgivenes thanks

John Mopel Napais

Oloolaimuitia,, Kenya

44% Repaid

About This Loan

Loan Principal Disbursed: USD 900.00
Date Disbursed: Nov 4, 2010
Repayment Period: Number of months or weeks from disbursement until loan is fully repaid 51 months
Total Interest Due to Lenders: This is the annual interest rate proposed by the borrower. Lenders may bid to finance the loan at the borrower’s proposed interest rate, or at a lower rate if they desire. If more bids are received than the amount needed to fund the loan, the borrower will accept the bids with the lowest proposed interest rates.

All interest rates displayed on the Zidisha website are expressed as flat percentages of loan principal per year the loan is held. For example, for a loan of USD 100, taken at 4% annual interest with a repayment period of six months, the total interest amount will be USD 100 * 4% * (6 months / 12 months) = $2.

The expression of interest rates as flat percentages of loan principal amounts is intended to make calculation of interest amounts more intuitive for borrowers and for lenders, and to facilitate comparison with other microfinance loans in borrowers' communities, the majority of which also use the flat rate methodology to express interest rates.
USD 142.56 (3.73%)
Borrower Transaction Fees: A transaction fee paid to Zidisha, expressed as a total amount and as a flat annualized percentage of the loan principal amount. USD 191.25 (5.00%)
Total Amount (Including Interest and Transaction Fee) to be Repaid: Interest plus transaction fees, expressed as a total amount and as a flat annualized percentage of the loan principal amount. USD 333.80 (8.73%)

Funding

Lender Name Amount (USD) Interest
jkurnia
(3,279)Karma is calculated on the basis of the total amount lent by the new members a member has recruited to Zidisha via email invites or gift cards, the number of comments a member has posted in the Zidisha website, and the total amount lent by a member.
10.000.00 %
bodilwDK
(17)Karma is calculated on the basis of the total amount lent by the new members a member has recruited to Zidisha via email invites or gift cards, the number of comments a member has posted in the Zidisha website, and the total amount lent by a member.
10.000.00 %
CWS
(1,297)Karma is calculated on the basis of the total amount lent by the new members a member has recruited to Zidisha via email invites or gift cards, the number of comments a member has posted in the Zidisha website, and the total amount lent by a member.
205.170.00 %
pranjal
(32)Karma is calculated on the basis of the total amount lent by the new members a member has recruited to Zidisha via email invites or gift cards, the number of comments a member has posted in the Zidisha website, and the total amount lent by a member.
10.003.00 %
jeffb
(465)Karma is calculated on the basis of the total amount lent by the new members a member has recruited to Zidisha via email invites or gift cards, the number of comments a member has posted in the Zidisha website, and the total amount lent by a member.
100.005.00 %
Anninymouse
(448)Karma is calculated on the basis of the total amount lent by the new members a member has recruited to Zidisha via email invites or gift cards, the number of comments a member has posted in the Zidisha website, and the total amount lent by a member.
7.005.00 %
marycb
(693)Karma is calculated on the basis of the total amount lent by the new members a member has recruited to Zidisha via email invites or gift cards, the number of comments a member has posted in the Zidisha website, and the total amount lent by a member.
200.005.00 %
joerg
(154)Karma is calculated on the basis of the total amount lent by the new members a member has recruited to Zidisha via email invites or gift cards, the number of comments a member has posted in the Zidisha website, and the total amount lent by a member.
13.215.00 %
Daniel
(501)Karma is calculated on the basis of the total amount lent by the new members a member has recruited to Zidisha via email invites or gift cards, the number of comments a member has posted in the Zidisha website, and the total amount lent by a member.
44.625.00 %
bgalon
(42)Karma is calculated on the basis of the total amount lent by the new members a member has recruited to Zidisha via email invites or gift cards, the number of comments a member has posted in the Zidisha website, and the total amount lent by a member.
100.005.00 %
fabian85
(17)Karma is calculated on the basis of the total amount lent by the new members a member has recruited to Zidisha via email invites or gift cards, the number of comments a member has posted in the Zidisha website, and the total amount lent by a member.
40.005.00 %
Trackside
(15)Karma is calculated on the basis of the total amount lent by the new members a member has recruited to Zidisha via email invites or gift cards, the number of comments a member has posted in the Zidisha website, and the total amount lent by a member.
50.005.00 %
cooperowl
(160)Karma is calculated on the basis of the total amount lent by the new members a member has recruited to Zidisha via email invites or gift cards, the number of comments a member has posted in the Zidisha website, and the total amount lent by a member.
100.005.00 %
rurumm
(29)Karma is calculated on the basis of the total amount lent by the new members a member has recruited to Zidisha via email invites or gift cards, the number of comments a member has posted in the Zidisha website, and the total amount lent by a member.
10.005.00 %

Repayment schedule


Repayments due as of Apr 21, 2014:  USD 237
Total repaid as of Apr 21, 2014:  USD 262

This loan was rescheduled on Jan 5, 2012
Date Due Amount Due Date Paid Paid Amount The Paid Amounts displayed here are the local currency amounts received, converted to US Dollars at the exchange rate that was effective at the time the loan was disbursed. The amounts credited to individual lenders are converted to US Dollars at the exchange rate that was effective at the time each repayment was received, and due to exchange rate fluctuations they may be more or less than the amounts displayed here.
Dec 04, 201081.55Nov 30, 201081.55
Jan 04, 201181.55Nov 30, 20100.64
  Feb 04, 201180.91
Feb 04, 20110.00  
Mar 04, 20110.00  
Apr 04, 20110.00  
May 04, 20110.00  
Jun 04, 20110.00  
Jul 04, 20110.00  
Aug 04, 20110.00  
Sep 04, 20110.00  
Oct 04, 201126.55Feb 04, 201126.55
Nov 04, 20110.00  
Dec 04, 20110.00  
Jan 04, 20120.00  
Feb 04, 201218.28Jun 03, 201218.28
Mar 04, 201218.28Jun 03, 20123.22
  Sep 21, 201215.06
Apr 04, 201218.28Sep 21, 201218.28
May 04, 201216.87Sep 21, 201216.87
Jun 04, 201210.31Sep 21, 20120.36
Jul 04, 201210.31  
Aug 04, 201210.31  
Sep 04, 201210.31  
Oct 04, 201210.31  
Nov 04, 201210.31  
Dec 04, 201210.31  
Jan 04, 201310.31  
Feb 04, 201310.31  
Mar 04, 201310.31  
Apr 04, 201310.31  
May 04, 201310.31  
Jun 04, 201310.31  
Jul 04, 201310.31  
Aug 04, 201310.31  
Sep 04, 201310.31  
Oct 04, 201310.31  
Nov 04, 201310.31  
Dec 04, 201310.31  
Jan 04, 201410.31  
Feb 04, 201410.31  
Mar 04, 201410.31  
Apr 04, 201410.31  
May 04, 201410.31  
Jun 04, 201410.31  
Jul 04, 201410.31  
Aug 04, 201410.31  
Sep 04, 201410.31  
Oct 04, 201410.31  
Nov 04, 201410.31  
Dec 04, 201410.31  
Jan 04, 201510.31  
Feb 04, 20150.00  
Total Amount Due591.23Total Paid Amount261.70